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Maeve

Revolt, She Said: Women and Film after ’68


“Don’t tell me how I’m supposed to be!” Maeve’s sharp retort to her boyfriend still resonates. Influenced by Brecht and Godard, director Pat Murphy gleefully snaps up their tactics for feminism, in order to tell the story of a young woman returning to home to Belfast after years in London.


Lines such as “men’s relationship to women is just like England’s relationship to Ireland” offer a reminder that, in May 68 The Troubles started as part of a wave of global struggles against imperialism – including the rule of patriarchy. A cast member of Born in Flames who wrote her own speeches, Irish filmmaker Murphy made an equally explosive film in Maeve.


“one that comes close to home for UK audiences in the era of Brexit and #MeToo. Ireland’s first bona-fide feminist film” – Irish Times

BBFC rating
15
Year
1981
Running time
115 mins
Country
Ireland
Director
Pat Murphy
Cast
Mary Jackson, Mark Mulholland, Brid Brennan

Carry Greenham Home

Revolt, She Said: Women and Film after ’68


Throughout history women have mobilized their status as mothers, daughters and grandmothers to protest war and violence. 1968 marked the year global alliances were formed between feminism and the peace and anti-Vietnam movements. Fly forward to the UK 1981, from the first arrivals Women for Life on Earth to the thirty thousand women who formed a human chain to Aldermaston in 1983, the Greenham Common Peace Camp was a shining example of non-violent feminist action, changing both lives and laws.


“The women of Greenham Common taught a generation how to protest,” noted Beeban Kidron, who made her first film living on-site with co-director Amanda Richardson. Shot on video, the film’s depiction of the courage, creativity and humour of the Greenham women contrasted greatly at the time with mainstream media portraits.


“It is moving to witness the bleak conditions in which the women continue their fight, and solidarity has a way of making you want to participate in its victories.” – Time Out


Accompanied by the short film A Question of Choice

Dir. Sheffield Film Co-op |UK 1982 | 18mins

Workers’ rights were at the heart of the ’68 protests, but where was the conversation about women and work? This film explores the lack of job prospects for Sheffield women with families to support. The women speak for themselves.

BBFC rating
15
Year
1983
Running time
27 mins
Country
UK
Other features
DOC
Director
Beeban Kidron, Amanda Richardson

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